Monday, June 15, 2020 adminshdee Guide No comments
COSTS & MONEY Accommodations are likely to be your biggest expense, but as fuel prices rise, transportation ranks up there too. Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia are more costly than other provinces, but not as bad as the three northern territories (Yukon Territory, Northwest Territories and Nunavut). Your dollar will stretch furthest in Québec, the Atlantic provinces, Manitoba and Saskatchewan. In most regions, single travelers who rent a car, stay in decent B&Bs and eat at least one daily meal out will spend $175 or so per day. The total cost is only a little bit more for a couple traveling together. For those on a tight budget, costs can be brought down by staying in hostels or camping, self-catering from local markets, taking public transportation when available and limiting entertainment options. This will reduce your daily costs to around $80 to $90. HOW MUCH? B&B double room: $80-140 Tim Hortons doughnut: 80¢ Hockey game ticket: $25-90 Skiing day pass: $50-80 Pack of cigarettes: $6-7 To break down the expenses you’ll incur: comfortable midrange accommodations start at $80 to $90 for a double room, usually including breakfast. A midrange restaurant meal with wine or beer costs between $15 and $25 plus tax and a tip. Rental cars cost from $35 to $65 a day for a compact-size vehicle, not including gas. Attraction admissions range from $5 to $15.
Monday, June 15, 2020 adminshdee Guide No comments
Currency Euro (€), Pound (£), Swiss franc (Sfr), Rouble (R) Language English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Russian, Hungarian, Greek, Turkish Visas EU citizens don’t need visas for other EU countries. Australians, Canadians, New Zealanders and Americans don’t need visas for visits of less than 90 days. Money ATMs are common; credit and debit cards are widely accepted. Mobile Phones Europe uses the GSM 900 network. If you’re coming from outside Europe it’s worth buying a prepaid local SIM. Time Britain, Ireland and Portugal (GMT), Central Europe (GMT plus one hour), Greece, Turkey and Eastern Europe (GMT plus two hours), Russia (GMT plus three hours). When to Go High Season (Jun–Aug) Everybody comes to Europe and all of Europe hits the road Hotel prices and temperatures are their highest. Expect all the major attractions to be nightmarishly busy. Shoulder Season (Apr–May & Sep–Oct) Crowds and prices drop, except in Italy where it’s still busy. Temperatures are comfortable but it can be hot in Southern Europe. Overall these are the best months to travel in Europe. Low Season (Nov–Mar) Outside ski resorts, hotels drop their prices or close down. The weather can be cold and days short, especially in Northern Europe. Some places, such as resort towns, are like ghost towns. Opening Hours In most of Europe businesses are open 9am to 6pm Monday to Friday, and 9am to 1pm or 5pm on Saturday. In smaller towns there may be a one- to two-hour closure for lunch. Some shops close on Sunday. Businesses also close on national holidays and local feast days. Banks have the shortest opening times, often closing between 3pm and 5pm, and occasionally even shutting for lunch. They only open on weekdays. Restaurants typically open from noon until midnight and bars open around 6pm. Museums usually close on Monday or (less commonly) on Tuesday. Exchange Rates Australia A$1 €0.64 Canada C$1€ 0.68 Japan ¥100 €0.81 NZN Z$1 €0.61 US US$1 €0.89 Daily Costs Budget: Less than €60 Dorm beds: €10–€20 Admission to museums: €5–€15 Pizza or pasta: €8–12 Midrange: €60–€200 Double room in a small hotel: €50–€100 Short taxi trip: €10–€20 Meals in good restaurants: around €20 per person Top end: More than €200 Stay at iconic hotels: from €150 Car hire: from around €30 per day Theatre tickets: €15–€150